Field work

Field prep for chronic medical conditions

 

Got field work and a medical condition? Well, you are not alone. Christina Baer, PhD candidate at the University of Missouri–St. Louis, shares great advice on how to prepare for a successful field season that accommodates your needs. We are hoping this post will not only be useful to someone with a medical condition, but also to any field crew-member trying to find out how to support a colleague. Please add a comment if you have any tips related to the topic!

In addition to being a field biologist, I also happen to be a Type 1 diabetic. I’ve just started my ninth year of field work, so it hasn’t slowed me down, but when you have a chronic medical condition, you definitely need to make some extra preparations. I’ve done field work in two very different situations: within driving distance of my home in the US and at field stations in Costa Rica. When I do field work, I’m walking around collecting data on caterpillars, so preparing for field work while living at home is the same as preparing for a hike.

Doing field work while living at a field station in a foreign country for ten or eleven weeks is a little more complicated. The field stations I’ve stayed at are comparable to Girl Scout summer camp—I’m not actually camping, but the only place that has constant air conditioning is the computer server room. Based on my experience, these are some of the preparations you should make before heading off for a long field season.

Disclaimer: I’m working on my PhD, not my MD—I am not a medical professional.

  1. Make sure your medical condition is more or less under control. This is important not just for your safety but also everyone else’s, and the success of the field work.
  2. Do a little worst-case scenario planning. What will happen if your symptoms get worse, you need to replace your medication, or you need to see a doctor? The field work I’ve done has been close to towns, so this would be relatively simple if it ever came up. But I also know researchers who work on remote mountains that they reach on foot or by horse. If you’re doing something like that, replacing medication will be more complicated than driving to the pharmacy.
  3. Pack backup supplies. If you have daily medications or supplies, take at least 1-2 weeks of extra supplies. These are not just important for emergencies, but also if you need to extend your field season. If that happens, the last thing you’ll want to be doing is filling prescriptions. If you have medical equipment, bring at least one extra of each, along with extra batteries and whatnot.

Bringing extras can be really important: one year, I left my insulin on a table in the dining hall at the same time a course group was leaving, and someone decided to send it along with them “just in case”. When I came back for lunch, I discovered that my insulin was headed halfway across Costa Rica. We got it back a week later (minus its cooling pack), but I would have been seriously inconvenienced if I hadn’t had extras.

The one downside to being well-prepared is that all those supplies can take up a lot of space, and packing space is always at a premium. All the science supplies are non-negotiable, so it usually comes down to medical supplies or clothes. Take the supplies. Even if you’ll only have three sets of field clothes to wear in rotation for three months, take the supplies.

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Packing for Costa Rica: The red rectangle in front shows my diabetes supplies. The green rectangle in back shows my clothes.

  1. Share information. Make sure people know what your medical condition is, that your medication is yours (see above), and whether it needs to be kept cold, dry, etc. If you’re traveling abroad, make sure you can describe your medical condition and medication to others. When I started teaching myself Spanish, some of the first things I looked up were “diabetic”, “insulin”, and how to ask for a refrigerator or ice. (Since so much medical terminology has its roots in Latin or is recently created, this probably won’t be hard. “Diabetic” and “insulin” are simply diabético/a and insulina in Spanish.)
  2. Follow medical advice in the field. Even if it’s not about your “real” medical problems. On a field course I took, a professor with some chronic health problems got dehydrated and didn’t drink his rehydration salts because they taste nasty. He developed a urinary tract infection, was carried out of our field site on a stretcher, and taken to the hospital in an ambulance. Not fun.

I hope this information is useful to some of you. If you have questions, feel free to contact me at baerc@umsl.edu, although I can’t promise to have answers.

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Christina Baer is a PhD candidate in the Marquis Lab at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. Her research interests include plant-insect interactions, natural history, and community ecology, so she’s doing her dissertation research on how tropical caterpillars build shelters to protect themselves from predators and parasitic insects. She wants to be a professor when she grows up.

 

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Long field seasons: how to prepare for one

Planning for a long field season next summer? Here is some advice for you. 

Recently, Leticia Soares wrote a post giving advice to students who are planning their first field season. Well, let’s be honest, we all could learn a thing or two (or a gazillion, in my case) about having a successful field season. Together, we decided that this was a topic worth extending, and we invited a few friends from the University of Missouri – St. Louis (UMSL) to give us (and you) some extra advice. In a previous post, Robbie Hart gave us some food for thought while in the field. In this post, you can read Mari Jaramillo‘s tips on how to plan for long periods in the field. She is a PhD candidate who works with avian malaria in the Galapagos islands. That’s right, she works in the Galapagos!! (sigh). Mari is a student in Dr. Patricia Parker’s lab at UMSL, and you can read more about her work at the end of this post.  

Taken at Tortuga Bay, Santa Cruz Island.

Taken at Tortuga Bay, Santa Cruz Island.

If you are lucky, field work doesn’t only take place during summer. Depending on the nature of your project you might need to stay at the field for extended periods of time, which for a field biologist is not hard at all. The hardest thing is probably leaving; you may be so comfortable you may want to make it your home…

But at some point you ought to know when you have collected enough data. No need to start crying and pouting though, the preliminary analysis of these data will point you in the right direction in future field seasons needed to complete your project.

Planning for extended field seasons is not that different from shorter ones, there’s just a lot more of it! Start thinking way ahead of time about the things that may take a while to get and be proactive about it. Lists are crucial! Ask yourself what things are indispensable for your research, for your assistants and for yourself and write these things down on a field or personal notebook. Also, you and your advisor will be glad if you check the list, item by item, with them or with your teammates that have been to the field site before. You could also send a list of personal items to your assistants and colleagues so they too are prepared for the field conditions and make sure they know about things that they are going to live without, like fresh water or electricity. Now, it doesn’t matter where and for how long you are going if all items in your list are checked off, you are good to go! And if you didn’t include it in your list, after all the scrutiny…

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…the truth is you will likely be fine without it.

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Field conditions and protocols are different from place to place; make sure you get acquainted with the rules and regulations of the different parks or reserves that you will be working at. Embrace the rules! You may find some of these rules are a pain in the %#$, but there is usually a pretty good reason behind them. Most of my field experience comes from work in the Galapagos Islands. These islands are a world icon and for that reason the park rules are more strict and extensive than anywhere else I have ever been. But I wouldn’t worry; there is a whole lot to enjoy as a scientist in these islands that no one else ever gets to experience!

The stars of the Pacific sky. Credit: Jeisson Zamudio.

The stars of the Pacific sky. Credit: Jeisson Zamudio.

If your work involves being away and isolated for long periods of time, you need to think survival!

Cover yours and everyone else’s basic needs and you will have a happy team! This means: food and water, a well-equipped first aid kit, a comfortable and warm place to sleep, a stove, gas or fuel and cooking equipment, duct tape (YES! Duct tape is a must!), rope, and never forget the matches!! I usually take a bunch of lighters and carry them in Ziploc bags in different places. Trust me, you do not want your field team to be eating cold food for two and a half months! This leads me to something I forgot to mention (and my advisor reminded me of), notice I said a ‘bunch of lighters’, not just one? Always take a spare, especially for items that are important for your work!! There are certain places in the Galapagos where you can head to do field work and find yourself in real isolation; it may take hours (and hundreds of dollars) for boats to get there, if an important piece of equipment brakes you’ll be glad to have a spare one!

Also, make your own plan of what to do in case something unusual happens or in case of an emergency and make sure everyone knows that plan. When the basics are covered, give yourself and your team a place to talk about the research each day. I usually break the group into two-people teams that go out and work all day to come back to camp before sunset. We may or may not have a cooking schedule (I’ve recently learned big groups alaways need schedules), but we usually eat dinner together, talk about how the day went and plan for the next day.

Some field experiences may be overwhelming, especially if it is the first time in a new place or leading a big group of people. You’re usually very busy and constantly planning for the next step… but I guess my best word of advice would be to stop and look around. I mean, really look around. You may be working with a single species but give yourself time to observe its surroundings, its habitat and its interactions with other organisms. Field work is a whole learning experience on its own, take advantage of it. And learn from others too, listen to other people’s ideas and suggestions; some people may surprise you with their creativity.

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Lastly, know that things never go exactly as planned. When this happens, IMPROVISE!

Even if that means adding sea water to the rice because you forgot to bring the salt, holding your arm up next to the roof drain at 3am to collect rain water for cooking because they told you there would be water up in the hut and there isn’t, or brushing your teeth with noodle water. Aah! All the good things about field work!

 

 

About Mari Jaramillo: I am an Ecuadorian biologist and have been doing field work in the Galapagos since 2008. I began as a field assistant in different projects with PhD students from Australia and Germany. I eventually ended up working with Dr. Sharon Deem, DVM, and Dr. Patricia Parker in a project under the Wildcare Center for Avian Health in the Galapagos Islands of the Saint Louis Zoo. Then I was awarded one of the scholarships for two Ecuadorian students established by Dr. Parker, Dr. Hernán Vargas and The Peregrine Fund to complete a master’s degree working with the Galapagos hawk. My master’s project (at UMSL) studied the impacts of ungulate (mainly goat) eradication on the diet of the Galapagos hawk on Santiago Island. This project required me to lead big groups of people to an uninhabited island for long periods of time (up to 2 1/2 mo) and very hard work. For my PhD I switched back to work with avian diseases. I’d like to break down the disease dynamics of avian malaria in this somewhat isolated archipelago to understand which are the main players in transmission and what is its effect on the endemic avifauna. However, I return to Santiago often to lead field seasons for the long term monitoring of the hawk population run by Dr. Parker in collaboration with Dr. Vargas and others (GNP, CDF).

Summer time, field work time: a beginners guide for a successful field season

I never valued summer enough before I started grad school in the US.  I come from a place where summer never goes away, and where changes in the rainfall make up the seasons. But nowadays, after some winters have passed, I get it , and I share the american obsession with the hot and shinny days.  

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All because, during summer, you can spend some time with Ryan Gosling at the beach…

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or hang out with your buddies at Bernie’s…

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and maybe even take some dance lessons…you never know.

But, if your are in grad school, summer time most likely means: Field work!

The reality of doing field work in the Caribbean - you gotta leave all that fun behind you.

The reality of doing field work in the Caribbean – you gotta leave all that fun behind you.

Field work can be one of the most inspiring, energizing, fruitful, and stressful moments of your research work. Here, I share some thoughts I gathered after some field seasons during my years in grad school.

If you are in the first year of your degree, and have just started a research project, chances are that you still have lots to define, understand and narrow down (including your questions and hypothesis). Usually, the field season that takes place in the first year is the one where you’ll rule out what can and cannot be done, as well as what can be improved in your research. The first planning strategy for a successful first field season is to always have at least two back up plans for everything, meaning that if plan A is your ideal scenario of how things will work, you should also have plan B and C for less ideal working situations. The second planning strategy that cannot be highlighted enough is: LISTS! You can avoid forgetting materials and equipments by retracing your work in the field several times, and listing everything you will need to get the work done. I usually bring some copies of the list of materials to the field, to make the organization on the way back easier. Third, have your methods very well clear for yourself, and for the ones that will work with you. Oh man…such an important detail that is frequently forgotten…specially if you’re coordinating interns for the first time. Have a data collection and annotation guide, and make sure that in the field, you and whoever you’re working with keep a copy of it (and shamelessly use it when needed). The last, but not least, advice is: prepare beforehand a detailed field schedule and stick to it – don’t forget to include rest days if you’re staying in the field for prolonged periods. The amount of days you’ll be able to have a healthy and efficient performance in the field depends from person to person, and on the type of field work, of course. Some people are ok and functional with working in the field for a long period of time. In my case, more than 30 consecutive days of waking up at 4 am, and working 15 hrs a day, usually don’t work very well. My ideal schedule is 15-20 work days followed by 1-2 days off.

After the field, organize the data as soon as you can, making a summary of effort and accomplishments. In my case, for instance, my field work involves mist netting birds, taking blood samples, and making blood smears. Thus, my field work summary consists of total captures per location and species, as well as detailed info on sampling location, and mist net hours (which gives me sampling effort, and also gives me an idea of my sampling efficiency). With the summary in hands, it is a good moment to ask yourself wether your project deserves a second field season or not. And, believe me, It’s OK if the answer is no – at this point drastic changes can be very beneficial – and better than sticking with something that has been tagged to failure. Reasons you should consider moving on towards something else can include: 1) overly expensive project for the amount of resources available for you; 2) excessively time consuming data collection (be realistic and think about statistic significance); 3) megalomania – oh yeah, there is a limit for what you can handle in the life-time of a PhD.

Like sex, jeans and hot yoga, field work only gets better with time – you become more efficient, more adapted to it, and more aware of your (and your project’s) limits. My final thought is: be a biologist, be an ecologist, be a naturalist, and enjoy your summers of field work. At some point in your degree summer time will mean lab work time, or data analysis time, or writing time…which are not bad, but cannot be done outdoors!

Good times during field work in the Caribbean. From left to right: Maria Pil, me and Bob Ricklefs.

Good times during field work in the Caribbean. From left to right: Maria Pil, me and Bob Ricklefs.